Is there a demographic more ‘at risk’ of unemployment?

According to the IPPR’s ‘Youth Tracker’, Issue 3, young black men were worst hit as a result of the recession. In comparing figures between the first quarter of 2008 (i.e. when the recession started) and the third quarter of 2009 the IPPR found that:

  • Almost  half  (48%)  of black  or  black  British  people  aged  16–24  were  unemployed.
  • Unemployment among  this  group  is  up  by  13%  since  the  recession  began

In using the claimant count statistics provided by the ONS website, the estimates for June 2010 are provided below:

Area Total “Ethnic minority” % of claimants EM “Asian or Asian British” % of claimants Asian/AB “Black or Black British” % of claimants Black/BB
Great Britain 378,780 52,130 14 20,725 5 17,505 5
England 318,895 50,780 16 20,170 6 17,225 5
Wales 22,115 640 3 215 1 135 1
Scotland 37,765 715 2 340 1 140 0
England and Wales 341,010 51,420 15 20,385 6 17,365 5
               
South West 20,940 1,000 5 190 1 365 2
Wales 22,115 640 3 215 1 135 1
North East 22,795 555 2 275 1 95 0
East 27,955 2,370 8 850 3 650 2
East Midlands 28,485 3,185 11 1,445 5 785 3
South East 33,700 2,625 8 1,055 3 615 2
Yorkshire and The Humber 41,550 4,705 11 2,810 7 785 2
West Midlands 44,860 9,495 21 5,040 11 2,165 5
London 46,600 22,230 48 6,150 13 10,785 23
North West 52,010 4,620 9 2,350 5 985 2

 Table 1 Claimant Count 18-24 year olds in June 2010 [Source:ONS]

The table (the regional section) is sorted by the total number of JSA claimants and shows the West Midlands has the third highest total. What is striking is that the percentage of those classed as ‘ethnic minorities’ (of the total number claiming) is extremely high – 21%. This is by far the highest percentage outside of London. There is a similar record when looking at the percentage of Asian or Asian-British claimants: 11% of the total claims.

We are unable to compute the percentage of the population who are claiming as we do not have up-to-date statistics for the demographic profile in June 2010. However, what this does show is a real need to be able to communicate and engage with communities in different and separate ways.

Perhaps this further emphasises the IPPR’s conclusion that: “The  findings  suggest the  Government’s   pledge  last  year  to  ‘shield’  ethnic  minorities  by  targeting support  at  disadvantaged  groups  has  not  proven effective.”[1]


[1] IPPR Youth Tracker Issue 3 p11

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